English Speaker Habits Using ‘Got’ – Quick Tip

If you’ve been studying English, you know there are many possible meanings of the word “get.” There are so many uses that it has become notoriously difficult for English learners to know how to use. The past tense of that word is “got,” and it is no exception to this wild and confusing system of uses and meanings. I’m not here to explain all the possible meanings of “got”. Instead, I specifically want to tell you about some habits that English speakers have when we talk. You’ll be able to read more quick tips like this on the Blog. Hopefully, this can clear things up a bit more (or confuse you a bit more)!

Got and Have, which one is right?

One habit that many English speakers have is saying “got” where they should be using “have.” This is where “have” means to possess something or needing to do something. This use is quite informal and is used more in casual speech. Read more about that here.

  • I got five rooms in my house.

More correctly would be: I have five rooms in my house.

A similar habit that people have is in situations where “have” is used in the present perfect. We might mean to say “have got,” but “have” gets completely taken out. Here’s an example:

  • I got to leave in five minutes.

More correctly is: I have (I’ve) got to leave in five minutes.

Because most of the time saying “have” and “have got” means the same thing, it can be hard to tell which of the two cases the speaker is using. Either way, they are referring to possession or a need to do something.

Another Note

In British-style English (British, Australian, South African, etc.), I notice it can be more common to say “have got” in place of “have.”

British: — Have you got any gum?

I’ve got some. Here you go.

Neutral: — Do you have any gum?

I have some. Here you go.

Again, I’m not saying only British-style accents use this. It’s just more common in those accents than in the American-style accents. And remember that all English speakers don’t have the habits listed above. Like any language, the region, social class, and personal experiences of the speaker play a role in how the individual talks. Still, you can bet lots of English speakers talk like this!

Read More Examples:

“Do you got a dress? I need one for the party.”

“Marissa got three kids? She looks so young!”

“Listen, I got to tell you something.”

“We got to go, hurry up!”

**Thank you for coming, curious readers! Have you heard English speakers talk like this? Do you think you could correct the example sentences with the right grammar? You’re doing great for seeking to learn more about this wonderful language! Keep on learning, my friends.

Working That English Muscle

Websites for practicing your skills

My English Pages: https://www.myenglishpages.com/

  • Practice general language skills, including some exercises and a blog.

Learn English British Council: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/

  • Blogs and interactive exercises to help with all parts of English learning for any level. The focus is more on British English.

Open Culture: http://www.openculture.com/freelanguagelessons

  • Find online courses, audiobooks, and even movies in English and many other languages.

Espresso English: https://www.espressoenglish.net/

  • Bite-sized lessons about English topics, including short videos and a blog.

English Club: https://www.englishclub.com/

  • General English practice, including some varied exercises, a forum and a writing space.

English Super Site: https://englishsupersite.com/

  • General English practice, especially good for understanding confusing words and terms. It has lots of little quizzes to test your knowledge too.

Perfect English Grammar: https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/

  • So many grammar exercises and explanations.

English-At-Home: https://www.english-at-home.com/

  • Has great tips about language points and skills, including some courses and guided practice.

EC English: https://www.ecenglish.com/en

  • Online English courses and practice, including some live courses and finding in-person destination courses.

K12 Reader: https://www.k12reader.com/

  • Assistance in reading skills with lots of reading exercises and worksheets, especially for young learners.

Engoo: https://engoo.com/app/materials/en

  • A wide array of practice, including current news articles, pronunciation, describing pictures, and lots of helpful conversation practice. They even have test prep.

Englisch-Hilfen: https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/

  • There are lots of exercises and games to help with grammar and vocabulary, including printable worksheets. I know they sound German, but trust me, they teach English.

English in 10 Minutes: https://englishin10minutes.com/

  • Here you can practice English by listening to quick podcasts with transcripts included, or do worksheets and learn about the importance of listening skills. The podcasts stories come from around the world and are pretty interesting.

Ludwig.guru: https://ludwig.guru/

  • This website is like a super dictionary. Besides giving you a simple definition, you can find translations, see the words in context, compare the word you are looking for to other words, and even see how popular the word is in daily speech. Ludwig is a great tool for being certain what word you want to use in English.

ELLLO: https://www.elllo.org/

  • A big library of video and audio lessons where you can practice listening skills and test your English knowledge. The audios come from different countries and accents too, so it’s a great place to get familiar with a variety of English speeches. Check it out!

Do you know of any other sources that are great for English learning or practice? Tell me down below! And let me know how these websites have worked for you.