“The Way I Are” [Timbaland, feat. Keri Hilson, D.O.E., Sebastian] – lyrics for English students

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Remember the time, baby? 

  • A way to bring up and reminisce about old times or better days. Sounds a little romantic. More formally, “Do you remember the time when … ?”

I ain’t got no money

  • Informal- or colloquial-style English used throughout the song. “I don’t have any money.”

I ain’t got no car to take you on a date _ I can’t even buy you flowers _ But together we could be the perfect soulmates

  • Soulmates are two people that are destined to be together.

Talk to me, girl _ Oh, baby, it’s alright now, you ain’t gotta flaunt for me

  • Flaunting is showing off in front of others, especially with money or physical objects.

If we go Dutch, you can still touch, my love is free

  • ”Going Dutch” is splitting the bill evenly among a couple or group, like at a restaurant. Keri will still love Timbaland even if they have to share the bill.

We can work without the perks, just you and me

  • “Make it work” or “work with it” means to make something function smoothly, like a relationship. “Perks” are bonuses or benefits, as with a job or with lovers, in this case.

Thug it out ’till we get it right

  • “Thug it out” means to hustle or to do hard, often illegal or illicit work to make a living

Baby, if you strip, you can get a tip _ ‘Cause I like you just the way you are _ I’m about to strip, and I’m well equipped

  • “Well-equipped” like “well-endowed” is a reference to a man being “gifted in bed,” let’s say. 

Can you handle me the way I’m are?

  • Again, incorrect colloquial language. “–the way I am?”

I don’t need the G’s or the car keys

  • G’s usually refer to a “grand,” which is another word for a thousand dollars. Maybe a light reference to G-6 planes, a kind of private jet. It sounds like she could also be saying “cheese” instead of G’s. Either way, the reference is about money.

Boy, I like you just the way you are _ And let me see ya strip, you can get a tip _ ‘Cause I like, I like, I like _ I ain’t got no Visa

  • He could be talking about both a Visa-flag debit/credit card, as well as a visa for traveling to foreign countries.

I ain’t got no Red American Express

  • A special red-colored Business card for high-earning cardholders.

We can’t go nowhere exotic 

  • *Double negatives!*

It don’t matter ’cause I’m the one that loves you best

  • “It doesn’t matter …”

Talk to me, girl _ Oh, baby, it’s alright now, you ain’t gotta flaunt for me _ If we go Dutch, you can still touch, my love is free _ We can work without the perks, just you and me _ Thug it out ’till we get it right _ Baby, if you strip, you can get a tip _ ‘Cause I like you just the way you are _ I’m about to strip and I’m well equipped _ Can you handle me the way I’m are? _ I don’t need the G’s or the car keys _ Boy, I like you just the way you are _ And let me see ya strip, you can get a tip _ ‘Cause I like you just the way you are _ Yeah, baby girl _ I don’t got a huge ol’ house, I rent a room in a house

  • Sometimes people add “old” to adverbs to emphasize them. For example, “big old house,” “mean old cat,” “ugly old car.” “Ol’” is a common American abbreviation for “old.”

Listen, baby girl _ I ain’t got a motorboat but I can float ya boat

  • “Float your boat” is a silly way to say you can make someone happy or feel good. Similarly, something or someone can “float my boat” if it makes me feel good. Usually this is said to be silly or funny, and not taken seriously.

So listen, baby girl _ Once you get a dose of D.O.E., you gon’ want some mo’

  • He makes a pun here since D.O.E. rhymes with “dough,” which is a slang term for Money. “Gon’” is the same as Going To. “Mo’” is the same as More. Dose usually refers to an amount of medicine. Informally, it can mean getting a piece or a taste of something or someone. “Try a dose of this drink.”

So listen, baby girl _ When I make it I want you back, want you back, yea _ Yeah, my money ain’t aloof like Phil and them

  • “Aloof” means conceptually distant. “Money goes long/far/a long way” is a way to say that you have a lot of money. Saying “… and them” is a way to refer to a group of people associated around a main person. Like “Obama and them” can mean Barack Obama and his family, associates, or close friends. I don’t know who Phil is supposed to be.

And it’s really not quite low as LSN

  • I think LSN is a job search website. His money isn’t so low that he needs to search for a job, maybe.

Your body ain’t Pamela Anderson

  • Pamela Anderson is a Canadian-born actress and model who was a major sex symbol throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. 

It’s a struggle just to get you in the caravan

  • He’s making a joke about the woman’s size, and it sounds like her body is not very attractive to him. That was ugly. Caravan here is a model of a car, not an actual traveling caravan. 

But listen, baby girl _ Before I let you lose a pound, I’ll buy a bigger car

  • Even though he said she’s fat, he still wants to do all he can to take care of her. Make up your mind!

So listen, baby girl _ I love you just the way ya are, the way ya are

Then the song repeats.

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